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Mathematical design for solid complex materials

Posted on 16/01/2019

The Newton Gateway to Mathematics is hosting a workshop on Mathematical Design for Solid Complex Materials on 27th February 2019 in Cambridge.

Mathematics plays an important role in ensuring that we continue to make technological advances in complex materials. Mathematical modelling and understanding are key enablers for complex material development and further promotes greater potential of these materials with actual engineering applications.

The Newton Gateway to Mathematics is hosting a workshop on Mathematical Design for Solid Complex Materials on Wednesday 27th February 2019 at the Isaac Newton Institute in Cambridge. This event is part of a research programme at the Isaac Newton Institute (INI) on the mathematical design of new materials, which brings together mathematicians and scientists working in various areas of materials science and applied mathematics. Key aims of the programme are to enhance theoretical understanding and modelling for these areas and to initiate a systematic study of the optimal design of new complex materials.

Mathematical Design for Solid Complex Materials, 27 February, Cambridge

A focus for the day will be the interesting classes of complex materials, such as shape memory alloys (SMAs) and those involving phase transformations. These materials have remarkable properties, including the ability to ‘memorise’ or retain their previous shape when subjected to certain stimuli such as thermomechanical or magnetic forces. They can be found in a broad range of commercial areas and have great potential in emerging applications.

This workshop will feature talks from leading academic researchers, as well as end users presenting challenges from the medical devices, energy and robotics industries. It will bring together mathematicians and scientists working in various areas of materials science and applied mathematics to further investigate opportunities in mathematical modelling to enable optimal design of complex new materials.

A copy of the programme is now available and will include sessions on ‘Innovations for Materials in Medical Devices and Regenerative Medicine’, ‘Innovations for Materials in Energy’ and also ‘Robotics.’

Further information can be found on the event webpage. A registration fee is being charged to cover attendance.

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